72 Years Ago, Today…Nagasaki, Japan

On 9 August, 1945, the United States dropped an atomic bomb on the city of Nagasaki, Japan. The first atomic bomb ever used was the one dropped on Hiroshima, Japan, which occurred on 6 August 1945. 140,000 people were killed in the bombing of Hiroshima, while 70,000 were killed in the bombing of Nagasaki. Men, women, and children all lost their lives in the blink of an eye.

Today, we have two man-children on two different continents, each with the ability to unleash those same horrors on the innocent with no regards to the cost. Those of us who have tried to talk sense to others, pleading for them to pay attention to the things which are vital to the survival of humanity and all other life on this planet, can only shake our heads in disbelief at the willful ignorance we are met with, time and time again.

I have no confidence that the Drumpf is capable of dealing with Kim Jong-Un on any reasonable level, and I know that I’m not the only one. From ABC News:

Amid growing tension between Washington and North Korea, the mayor of Nagasaki said Wednesday that the fear of another nuclear bomb attack is growing at a ceremony marking the 72nd anniversary of the U.S. atomic bombing of his city.

Nagasaki Mayor Tomihisa Taue urged nuclear states to abandon such weapons and criticized Japan’s government for not taking part in the global effort toward a nuclear ban.

The bombing anniversary comes just as Pyongyang and Washington are trading escalating threats. President Donald Trump threatened North Korea “with fire and fury” and North Korea’s military said Wednesday it was examining its plans for attacking Guam.

“The international situation surrounding nuclear weapons is becoming increasingly tense,” Taue said at Nagasaki’s peace park. “A strong sense of anxiety is spreading across the globe that in the not too distant future these weapons could actually be used again.”…Taue sharply criticized Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s government for what he said were empty promises about working to achieve a nuclear-free world. He said Japan’s absence even during diplomatic negotiations for the U.N. Nuclear Prohibition Treaty, adopted in July, is “incomprehensible to those of us living in the cities that suffered atomic bombings.”

The outspoken mayor praised the atomic bombing survivors, or “hibakusha,” for their lifelong devotion to the effort. He urged Japan’s government to change its policy of relying on the U.S. nuclear umbrella and join the nuclear prohibition treaty as soon as possible.

The atmosphere today seems to be far more tense than it was during the height of the Cold War, and that’s saying quite a bit. All one can do is prepare for the worst and hope for the best…and whatever happens, happens.

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