Congratulations, Serena: It’s A Girl!

I’d originally considered re-blogging a post containing some lovely nature photographs today, but this bit of news that I happened across is worth reporting! Tennis superstar Serena Williams and her partner / fiancé, Reddit co-founder Alexis Ohanian, welcomed a baby girl into the world on 1 September. From BBC News:

Tennis star Serena Williams has given birth to a baby girl at a clinic in Florida.

Williams, 35, whose partner is Reddit co-founder Alexis Ohanian, was admitted to the St Mary’s Medical Center in West Palm Beach on Wednesday. The 23-time Grand Slam winner said last month she was planning to return to tennis for the Australian Open in January.

Congratulations have been pouring in from sports stars and celebrities. News of the birth came as her sister Venus prepared to go out on court at the US Open.

“Obviously I’m super-excited,” Venus said. “Words can’t describe it.” The couple are yet to confirm the birth themselves but Serena’s coach, Patrick Mouratoglou, tweeted: “I am so happy for you and I feel your emotion.”

He added: “Btw … I wish you a speedy recovery… we have a lot of work ahead of us.” Serena admitted she had revealed her pregnancy to the world in April by accident, after mistakenly uploading a photograph on Snapchat. She won the Australian Open title this January while newly pregnant, and in an article in Vogue last month she said she wanted to defend her title.

“It’s the most outrageous plan,” she said. “I just want to put that out there. That’s, like, three months after I give birth.” In June she appeared in a nude cover photo for Vanity Fair, saying: “I don’t know what to do with a baby.” The news has delighted the tennis world, with Rafa Nadal among the first to tweet his congratulations.

Congratulations to Serena and Alexis – all the best to you and your new little one! Blessed be.

Wordless Wednesday: Vintage Americana

The title says it all…enjoy!

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BGR 2017: Celebration in Pictures!

The Black Girls Rock 2017 celebration took place on Saturday, 5 August, but you wouldn’t know it unless you had marked the schedule on your respective calendars! I found little coverage and virtually no articles about this event, but I can’t say that I’m surprised – par for the course, sad to say.

In light of that, here are a few pictures with some positive, uplifting quotes for those of us who are overlooked and under-represented on a daily basis!

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Philadelphia Resident Vashti Dubois Turns Home into Museum Dedicated to Black Women

This is excellent news – I plan on visiting this museum on our next road trip!

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GOOD BLACK NEWS

Museum founder and proprietor Vashti Dubois (photo via metro.co.uk)

by Adam Smith via metro.co.uk

There is a museum like no other in Philadelphia. You would not have heard it, it is not listed anywhere and there are no signs from the motorway. Only the hand carved wooden sign in the garden hinted that the Victorian house was not like any other home in the world – and the woman who opened the door had the smile of someone who knew she was about to amaze you.

For years Vashti Dubois was sick of not seeing any images of black girls or women in museums and art galleries, so three years ago she decided to do something about it. The 56-year-old turned her house into The Colored Girls Museum, celebrating everything about black women and their place in the universe. Standing in the hallway, which screams with colour due to every inch…

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Tuesday Tunes & Soothing Scenery…13 June 2017

To counter the ugliness that is rampant here in the USA, around the world, and everywhere on the Interwebs, I offer up some soothing scenery of beautiful people and beautiful places, along with some relaxing music. Enjoy…

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Midweek Music

I felt like posting some pictures and music for this final day in May, 2017…enjoy!

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Notable Black Women: Bessie Coleman

Bessie Coleman: 26 January 1892 – 30 April 1926

Today, 26 January, marks the birthdate of Bessie Coleman; it is her 125th “birth anniversary.” She was the first woman of African-American and Native American descent to hold a pilot license and an international pilot license. From the American Experience PBS site:

Bessie Coleman, the first African American female pilot, grew up in a cruel world of poverty and discrimination. The year after her birth in Atlanta, Texas, an African American man was tortured and then burned to death in nearby Paris for allegedly raping a five-year-old girl. The incident was not unusual; lynchings were endemic throughout the South. African Americans were essentially barred from voting by literacy tests. They couldn’t ride in railway cars with white people, or use a wide range of public facilities set aside for whites. When young Bessie first went to school at the age of six, it was to a one-room wooden shack, a four-mile walk from her home. Often there wasn’t paper to write on or pencils to write with.

When Coleman turned 23 she headed to Chicago to live with two of her older brothers, hoping to make something of herself. But the Windy City offered little more to an African American woman than did Texas. When Coleman decided she wanted to learn to fly, the double stigma of her race and gender meant that she would have to travel to France to realize her dreams.

It was soldiers returning from World War I with wild tales of flying exploits who first interested Coleman in aviation. She was also spurred on by her brother, who taunted her with claims that French women were superior to African American women because they could fly. In fact, very few American women of any race had pilot’s licenses in 1918. Those who did were predominantly white and wealthy. Every flying school that Coleman approached refused to admit her because she was both black and a woman. On the advice of Robert Abbott, the owner of the “Chicago Defender” and one of the first African American millionaires, Coleman decided to learn to fly in France.

She was apparently the tenth of thirteen children born to sharecroppers George Coleman, who was of the Choctaw tribe and African-American, and his wife Susan, who was African-American. She began attending school at the age of six in Waxahachie, Texas. She completed all eight grades at that school, but her routine of school, chores, and church was interrupted annually by the cotton harvest. Still, she was an avid reader and an outstanding math student, which probably led her to go after her dream of flying, no matter where it took her. Being an Aquarius didn’t hurt, either!

Sadly, her life and career were cut short in a tragic accident that occurred during a practice flight in Jacksonville, Florida:

Coleman took her tragic last flight on April 30, 1926, in Jacksonville, Florida. Together with a young Texan mechanic called William Wills, Coleman was preparing for an air show that was to have taken place the following day. At 3,500 feet with Wills at the controls, an unsecured wrench somehow got caught in the control gears and the plane unexpectedly plummeted toward earth. Coleman, who wasn’t wearing a seat-belt, fell to her death.

About 10,000 mourners paid their last respects to the first African American woman aviator, filing past her coffin in Chicago South’s Side. Her funeral was attended by several prominent African Americans and it was presided over by Ida B. Wells, an outspoken advocate of equal rights. But despite the massive turnout and the tributes paid to Coleman during the service, several black reporters believed that the scope of Coleman’s accomplishments had never truly been recognized during her lifetime. An editorial in the “Dallas Express” stated, “There is reason to believe that the general public did not completely sense the size of her contribution to the achievements of the race as such.”

She is truly an inspiration to many, and her name deserves to be spoken with the same reverence and esteem that Amelia Earhart’s is. Sadly, when it comes to giving women historical credit, that honour is nearly always reserved for white women. Racism and segregation have only served to keep non-white women out of institutions of learning, and the revisionist white-washing of history has all but erased us from schoolbooks and other texts of education. We made our mark on this country and continue to do so. This is another woman who should be looked up to and emulated. She overcame far more than most women today can even imagine. I salute her today.

Midweek Musings: My Kind of Pagans

I was looking to see if there are ANY fair representations of non-white pagans and / or “women warriors,” since the few people with whom I speak with online essentially don’t give a shit if I feel welcome at pagan gatherings or not. I commend their honesty, at the very least!

Anyway, I did a bit of browsing and found that, at the very least, I’m not completely alone! Nice to know that at least a few other sisters are out and about, brandishing sword or bow, and rocking awesome armour! We kick ass…I suppose that terrifies many, LOL! There need to be more of us, as far as I’m concerned…

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Protected: Inner Child At Play…Birthday Week!!!

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Rare Photos of Victorian Women of Color

I absolutely love these outfits! Beautiful…
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Feminist Elizabethan

Historical photographs of women of color (WOC) can be hard to find, but Bust did just this.

In a recent post, Bust featured several photographs of Victorian WOC, and in the photos, various WOC can be seen posing while wearing the fashions of the time (my fave is the woman lounging on a chaise). Some of these photos can be found below, and to check out even more photos of Victorian WOC, go here.

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