R.I.P., Ameila Boynton Robinson

Amelia Platts Boynton Robinson: 18 August 1911 – 26 August 2015

One of the matriarchs of the civil rights movement, Amelia Boynton Robinson, passed away early yesterday morning at the age of 104. She was the first Black woman to run for congress in Alabama, and a survivor of “Bloody Sunday.” That was the day that she and many others marched across the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama. Peaceful protestors were met with armed state troopers, who beat them mercilessly and tear-gassed them – Amelia was beaten unconscious. From Al-Jazeera:

Amelia Boynton Robinson, a civil rights activist who nearly died while helping lead the “Bloody Sunday” civil rights march in 1965, championed voting rights for blacks and was the first black woman to run for Congress in Alabama, died early Wednesday at age 104, her son Bruce Boynton said.

Boynton Robinson was among those beaten during the voting rights march across the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama, in March 1965 that became known as “Bloody Sunday.” State troopers teargassed and clubbed the marchers as they tried to cross the bridge. A newspaper photo showing Boynton Robinson, who had been beaten unconscious, drew wide attention to the movement.

Fifty years later, Barack Obama, the first black president of the United States, pushed her across the span in a wheelchair during a commemoration.

Boynton Robinson, who was hospitalized in July after having a major stroke, turned 104 on Aug. 18. Her son said she had been living in Tuskegee and was hospitalized in Montgomery. Boynton Robinson’s family said in a written statement that she was surrounded by relatives and friends when she died around 2:20 a.m.

In January, Boynton Robinson attended the State of the Union address as a special guest of Democratic Alabama Rep. Terri Sewell, who said Boynton’s 1964 run for Congress paved the way for her. Sewell is Alabama’s first elected black congresswoman. Boynton was the first woman to run on a Democratic ticket in Alabama and the first black woman to run for Congress in the state, according to the Encyclopedia of Alabama.

“Mrs. Boynton Robinson suffered grave injustices on the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma at the hands of state troopers on Bloody Sunday, yet she refused to be intimidated,” Sewell said in January. “She marched with Dr. Martin Luther King, my colleague Rep. John Lewis and thousands of others from Selma to Montgomery and ultimately witnessed the day when their work led to the passage of the historic Voting Rights Act of 1965.”

A lady of immense courage and strength – a true warrior. Rest easy now, Amelia…you join a pantheon of true heroes. Your accomplishments should be an inspiration for youth of today, and generations to come.

Lest we forget…

Sunny Sunday…

Credit: intelligenttravel.nationalgeographic.com

The sun is out now, but it rained overnight – it’s definitely needed!

Just had a few random things on my mind to share on this fine Sunday…a few little things which may or may not be of interest, so here goes!

First off, I know that there has been an official autopsy report in the death of Sandra Bland, who was laid to rest yesterday. I will freely admit that I’m very, very skeptical of it – and I’m not the only one. In light of recent events, it isn’t hard to see why many are skeptical.

The abducted young ladies of Chibok, Nigeria, have been away from their families and loved ones for 468 days now…it’s sad and disheartening. All I can do is hold out hope that they will be freed.

I have an ISTP ‘personality type,’ from what I’ve learned over the years – I think it is what enables me to laugh at myself as loudly as I laugh at anything else that tickles my funny-bone, LOL

Maybe that will give you more insight into who I am…but then again, it probably won’t. This is fine with me, either way!

😉

Today marks the Procession of the Witches, also called Heksenstoet, in Beselare, Belgium. It’s an interesting local festival, there. From Expatica.com:

“Beselare in West Flanders has been associated with stories about witches for centuries. Its most famous witch is Sefa Bubbles, who according to legend was the witch chief of all the local witches.

You can see her at the local witch festival or Heksenstoet, held on the last Sunday in July, with songs and dances about her, and her children. But she’s certainly not the only important witch in town; in the weeks before the festival, every local household makes its own witch, and enters it in a village competition to win a prize for the best one.

You can see life-sized gnarled old papier mache witches sitting outside every gatepost and every door. The local folklore has it that husbands have been known to sit their unwitting mothers-in-law outside on the judging day of the competition.

Everyone dresses up as a witch for the day. The local people say it never, ever rains for the witch parade. True to form, last Sunday, the day remained gloriously hot and sunny. Sorcery!

Once the Witch horse riders have cleared the road, and the parade gets underway, two marchers carry forward a large sign reading ‘In this village, there is witchcraft!’, and the first of many floats go past (including a vast 17th-century castle which caused hilarity one year by getting stuck on the bunting across the road).”

I’m getting ready to watch a baseball game, so I’ll close with two funny videos and a song…I know that my humour might not be to everyone’s tastes, so feel free to not watch them! You’ve been warned, ROFL

XD

 

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