Chris Singleton, Son of Charleston Church Shooting Victim Sharonda Coleman-Singleton, Drafted by Chicago Cubs

This is fantastic news. Chris’s mother would be incredibly proud of him, if her life hadn’t been cut short by a hate-filled piece of filth. I’m looking forward to watching him display his talents on the field!

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GOOD BLACK NEWS

Chris Singleton and his mother Rev. Sharonda Coleman-Singleton (photo via thebiglead.com)

by Paula Rogo via essence.com

The son of one of the victim’s of the Charleston church shooting was drafted to a major league baseball team almost two years to the day of the tragedy. The Chicago Cubs nabbed Chris Singleton in the 19th round of the draft last Wednesday. He played baseball at Charleston Southern University. His mother, the Rev. Sharonda Coleman-Singleton, and eight other people were gunned down in 2015 by Dylann Roof inside Charleston’s Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church.

“We certainly understand and have deep sympathy for his backstory, but what I want to make sure doesn’t get lost is that this guy’s a really good baseball player,” said Jason McLeod, the Cubs’ senior vice president of scouting and player development. “We had him evaluated really as a top-10-round-caliber talent.”

Roof was sentenced…

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Five Friday Songs: 23 June 2017!

The sun is out, the weather is getting better and better, and there’s a New Moon today – so, let’s have some music to get the weekend started off right!

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Full Frontal Thursday: 21 June 2017 Edition

In these clips, Sam talks about the recent special elections in Georgia and North Carolina, asks why New York refuses to protect victims of abuse, and how vocabulary has been swirling ’round the bowl as it goes the way of respect, decency, and common sense.

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Where are the Afro-Brazilians in history books? 17 black people that you never learned about in school

This is an all-too-common practice, unfortunately. The “white-washing” of history is shameful and needless. Ignorant, narrow-minded colonials with supremacist beliefs wish to erase and eliminate the rich heritage and culture of non-white peoples worldwide.

Black Women of Brazil

capa

Note from BW of Brazil: Today’s article is short, right to the point and something that my research and experiences on/in Brazil demonstrate why such material is important. The first reason is something I’ve mentioned in a previous post. On my very first trip to Brazil, I went to Salvador, Bahia, a city that is considered the country’s center of African culture. Within a few days of my arrival, one of my friends who was acting as my guide in the city along with a young man I had become acquainted with shortly thereafter took me to a small restaurant in the city’s historic Pelourinho district. In this small restaurant, I saw a photo of the great intellectual and anthropologist Lélia Gonzalez. As I stood in awe of the photo, my two companions wondered why I was looking at the photo. Neither of the two had any idea who…

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Egyptian Quackers in Germany~

How about some beautiful Egyptian geese for the first full day of summer? I don’t refer to geese as quackers – that name goes to ducks – I call them “honkers!”

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Is there anything more winsome than newly hatched Egyptian goslings?

Mama is quite a beauty too!

Germany has a wonderful selection of exotic birds swimming in their lakes and rivers.

Egyptian Geese originated in the Nile Valley and Africa, and were considered sacred by the Ancient Egyptians who first domesticated them.

People bought these geese as ornamental birds and many escaped, establishing feral colonies all over Western Europe.

I saw these beauties swimming in The Neckar River in Heidelberg during my April trip.

Cheers to you from The Holler, and from the hopefully, still-happily paddling geese in Germany~

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Summer Solstice Blessings…2017

Blessed Summer solstice…’tis the longest day of the year. Blessed be!

Juneteenth – 2017!

Today marks the 152nd celebration of Juneteenth. What is Juneteenth, you might be asking? Well, it is the day in 1865 that slavery officially ended in the state of Texas: a full two and half years after President Abraham Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation, which became official nationwide on 1 January 1863. From the Juneteenth website:

Juneteenth is the oldest known celebration commemorating the ending of slavery in the United States. Dating back to 1865, it was on June 19th that the Union soldiers, led by Major General Gordon Granger, landed at Galveston, Texas with news that the war had ended and that the enslaved were now free. Note that this was two and a half years after President Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation – which had become official January 1, 1863. The Emancipation Proclamation had little impact on the Texans due to the minimal number of Union troops to enforce the new Executive Order. However, with the surrender of General Lee in April of 1865, and the arrival of General Granger’s regiment, the forces were finally strong enough to influence and overcome the resistance.

One of General Granger’s first orders of business was to read to the people of Texas, General Order Number 3 which began most significantly with:

“The people of Texas are informed that in accordance with a Proclamation from the Executive of the United States, all slaves are free. This involves an absolute equality of rights and rights of property between former masters and slaves, and the connection heretofore existing between them becomes that between employer and free laborer.”

The reactions to this profound news ranged from pure shock to immediate jubilation. While many lingered to learn of this new employer to employee relationship, many left before these offers were completely off the lips of their former ‘masters’ – attesting to the varying conditions on the plantations and the realization of freedom. Even with nowhere to go, many felt that leaving the plantation would be their first grasp of freedom. North was a logical destination and for many it represented true freedom, while the desire to reach family members in neighboring states drove the some into Louisiana, Arkansas and Oklahoma. Settling into these new areas as free men and women brought on new realities and the challenges of establishing a heretofore non-existent status for black people in America. Recounting the memories of that great day in June of 1865 and its festivities would serve as motivation as well as a release from the growing pressures encountered in their new territory. The celebration of June 19th was coined “Juneteenth” and grew with more participation from descendants. The Juneteenth celebration was a time for reassuring each other, for praying and for gathering remaining family members. Juneteenth continued to be highly revered in Texas decades later, with many former slaves and descendants making an annual pilgrimage back to Galveston on this date.

Of course, the Emancipation Proclamation didn’t keep free Black men and women from being illegally rounded up and sent back to plantations. The ending of slavery did not end the brutal treatment from whites. It didn’t stop families from being separated and torn from each other. It didn’t immediately make Black people equal, nor did it instantly “level the playing field.” We’ve come a long way…but there is still a long way to go. I’ll elaborate on this more in a post scheduled for tomorrow.

Last Week Tonight: 18 June 2017 Edition

In this episode, John talks about the decline of the coal industry here in the USA, and how the Drumpf’s empty campaign promise to bring back coal mining and domestic steel production was a colossal whopper of a lie.

Happy Father’s Day…2017!

For all of the real men out there who know what being a father entails, today is your day…so relax and enjoy it! Special shout-outs to the two best fathers I know: my own dad, and my awesome husband – you guys rock!

Here are a few funnies celebrating dads on their special day, along with a song.

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Joy Bishara and Lydia Pogu, Two Escaped Boko Haram Abductees, Graduate From High School in VA, Head to Southeastern University

This is excellent news to read in the midst of the travesty of the unjust verdict handed down in the brutal murder of Philando Castile. These brave young women were abducted, tortured, raped, and held against their will – solely for wanting an education. They have realized their dream; here’s hoping that the girls who remain in captivity will be able to do the same!

#ChibokGirls
#BringBackOurGirls

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GOOD BLACK NEWS

(photo via instagram.com)

by Taryn Finley via huffpost.com

Two of the nearly 300 Nigerian schoolgirls kidnapped by Boko Haram in 2014 are telling their story. Joy Bishara, 20, and Lydia Pogu, 19, are among the 57 girls who were able to escape from the terrorist group. The duo gave People Magazine a detailed account of horrors they faced when the gunmen invaded their school in Chibok, Nigeria, and the events that followed.

The girls were sleeping when the invasion occurred. They woke to the sounds of gunshots and bombs. Pogu told People that men in uniforms stormed into their dorm and told them they were officers who were there to protect them. But the girls said they knew they weren’t real officers based on the way they described themselves.

“We were all crying and screaming. They told us to keep quiet or they’re going to kill us. So…

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