Reactive Blogging?

I celebrated my 7-year “Blog-o-versary” in October of this year. I don’t think that I’m a novice to this blogging thing. There was virtually no traffic here for the first couple of years; I wasn’t able to post very often due to job responsibilities, and the only comments I received were spam. I only followed a handful of blogs at that time – less than 10, I think – and while I would ‘Like’ posts, I wouldn’t comment and I didn’t follow anyone. I simply didn’t have the time.

After I left my last full-time job and began scheduling my own work on my own time, I had more time to read other blogs in depth. I began following more, commenting once in a while, and re-blogging others – possibly in excess, but I meant no harm. I thought that displaying a genuine interest in others and engaging in conversations would make it easier to meet and connect with others. I hoped to have conversations with others who might share my interests in recreational activities such as music, travel, cooking, reading, writing, gaming, anime and cosplay, or attending fun events involving same. I was doing my due diligence and actively ‘connecting with others’ in this supposedly supportive blogging community.

According to the self-described blogging experts out there, all of the time and energy that I’ve invested in other people’s blogs just isn’t enough to generate traffic. Meanwhile, there are brand-new, poorly-written blogs out there which are springing up like weeds and mysteriously have hundreds of followers. Keep in mind that I had slowly grown my following to a little over 300 followers, and only recently dumped the blogs which are inactive or have been deleted by the author or by WordPress. Most others who used to follow me made themselves absent after certain political events worldwide occurred – there’s nothing I can do about that!

I decided to pose a question to a blogger who has tens of thousands of followers, on a post of theirs titled “Reactive networking / Blogging.” In their post, they state this:

Blogging lesson for the day is on reactive networking.

You’ll often hear bloggers state what they dislike with blogging. They’ll complain about the driveby reader or someone who just presses “like” on their posts. These bloggers are so busy complaining about blogging that they miss the opportunity it is giving them…The problem is that most people want interaction without ever giving it first. That is very hard to obtain. I network reactively most days and don’t browse the new pool of bloggers as much…Someone that just likes your posts doesn’t mean they are a spammer or they are trying to trick you…why not visit a few people today that just leave likes. Interact back and a bit further than them and see where it takes you. Networking is a push of many fronts, not just one.

My thought is this: “reactive” blogging is all well and good, and it obviously works for a lot of people. I opt for the proactive and interactive method, myself. Those who don’t want to interact with me aren’t going to, and all the helpful advice in the world isn’t going to change that. A reflex is a reaction, after all. It doesn’t take much time to do, and requires absolutely no thought.

Observing the blogging and commenting patterns of other bloggers, and making the casual comment about same, isn’t complaining. It shows that I’m actually reading and paying attention.

Isn’t that the important thing?

😎

2 Comments (+add yours?)

  1. sepultura13
    Dec 11, 2017 @ 13:20:22

    Is your blog on Facebook?

  2. Opinionated Man
    Dec 09, 2017 @ 06:00:56

    Reblogged this on HarsH ReaLiTy and commented:
    Hmmm I disagree with the “experts.” The interaction you do IS enough to drive traffic as long as you keep looking for “new” traffic. Hence the point about “many fronts.” Thanks for the mention! -OM
    Note: Comments disabled here. Please visit their blog.

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