1,000 Days.

Today marks a sad milestone: 1,000 days. Today marks one thousand days in captivity for the majority of the 276 girls who were kidnapped by Boko Haram back in April of 2014. That’s tragic, frustrating, and quite maddening. Entire families still holding out hope that their daughters and sisters will be returned to them, if they’re even still alive. There have been a few hopeful occurrences recently – for instance, 21 of the girls were released in a deal brokered by the International Red Cross. Also, just the other day, a girl was found and rescued, along with her 6-month-old baby. From BBC News:

The Nigerian army says that one of the abducted Chibok schoolgirls has been found, along with her six-month-old baby. She was discovered by soldiers investigating suspected members of Islamist militant group Boko Haram. Nigeria’s military said the young woman is undergoing medical checks.

A total of 276 schoolgirls were kidnapped by Boko Haram from the town of Chibok in April 2014. About 200 of them are still in captivity. More than 20 were released in October in a deal brokered by the International Red Cross. Others have escaped or been rescued. Over Christmas, 21 of the young women freed under the October deal returned home for the first time.”

However, it turns out that the girls didn’t get to see their families until AFTER the December holiday:

Families of the Nigerian “Chibok girls” freed by Islamist group Boko Haram say they are being closely guarded and were not allowed home for Christmas.

Boko Haram kidnapped 276 girls in April 2014, but freed 21 of them in October after negotiations with the Red Cross. The freed girls have been in government custody since their release but were brought home to Chibok for Christmas. But family members told the BBC that the girls were kept in a politician’s house and barred from going home. They were also prevented from attending church services with their families.

The girls were take to the house of an assembly member in Chibok to be reunited with their parents but weren’t allowed to go to their own homes. “I can’t believe my daughter has come this close to home but can’t come home,” said one father. “There’s no point bringing them to Chibok only to be locked in another prison. They couldn’t even go to church on Christmas Day.”

Another said a soldier had confiscated his phone when he tried to take a picture of his daughter. He said: “I snapped picture of myself and my daughter but the security guys came and grabbed me by shoulder and snatched the phone from my hands and told me to delete all the picture I took. I told him I’m taking a picture with my daughter who was away for more than two years. He said to me that’s not his business, he deleted all the pictures including other pictures that were not taken there.”

One mother said: “I can’t believe my eyes that now my daughter cannot come home. How can I be happy when they don’t have freedom?”

1,000 days of heartache. 1,000 days of fear, terror, and abuse. 1,000 days of punishment for wanting an education.

Others have forgotten, or simply don’t care. I won’t forget. I can’t forget. I will continue with these updates until they are all returned home…if it takes another thousand days, or more.

#BringBackOurGirls

2 Comments (+add yours?)

  1. Brian Lageose
    Jan 09, 2017 @ 16:22:58

    Sad, and ridiculous that so little is being done and this is being ignored by the American media. Yet we get news updates every time Trump scratches his ass…

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